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Facies and coralline algae from Oligocene limestones in the Malaguide Complex (SE Spain)

Juan C. Braga and Davide Bassi
Annalen des Naturhistorischen Museums in Wien. Serie A für Mineralogie und Petrographie, Geologie und Paläontologie, Anthropologie und Prähistorie
113. Bd. (2011), pp. 291-308
Published by: Naturhistorisches Museum
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41701742
Page Count: 18
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Facies and coralline algae from Oligocene limestones in the Malaguide Complex (SE Spain)
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Abstract

Coralline algae are the main components of the Oligocene (Rupelian-early Chattian?) limestones in Sierra Espuna in SE Spain, one of very few localities with shallow-marine Oligocene deposits in the Iberian Peninsula. Sierra Espuna is part of the Malaguide Complex in the Internal Zones of the Betic Cordillera, which, in the Palaeogene, constituted a terrane in the western Tethys to the east of its present location. Fossil components, lithofacies, and stratigraphie patterns of the Oligocène limestones indicate that they formed on a carbonate ramp that developed on and interfingered with deltaic deposits. The innermost faciès belts are packstones to mudstones rich in porcelaneous foraminifers. Seawards of these low-energy environments, a bioclastic belt with corals and coralline algae passed into an area in which flat and branching corals thrived. In a deeper faciès belt, rhodoliths and loose-branching and foliose coralline algae were the main sediment producers together with hyaline larger benthic foraminifers. The mastophoroids Neogoniolithon and Spongites dominate the shallower coralline algal assemblages, whereas melobesioids (Lithothamnion and Mesophyllum species) and sporolithales (Sporolithon) are the most abundant components in the more diverse deeper-water assemblages.

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