Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Short-term plasticity constrains spatial organization of a hippocampal presynaptic terminal

Suhita Nadkarni, Thomas M. Bartol, Charles F. Stevens, Terrence J. Sejnowski and Herbert Levine
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 109, No. 36 (September 4, 2012), pp. 14657-14662
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41706263
Page Count: 6
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Short-term plasticity constrains spatial organization of a hippocampal presynaptic terminal
Preview not available

Abstract

Although the CA3-CA1 synapse is critically important for learning and memory, experimental limitations have to date prevented direct determination of the structural features that determine the response plasticity. Specifically, the local calcium influx responsible for vesicular release and short-term synaptic facilitation strongly depends on the distance between the voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) and the presynaptic active zone. Estimates for this distance range over two orders of magnitude. Here, we use a biophysically detailed computational model of the presynaptic bouton and demonstrate that available experimental data provide sufficient constraints to uniquely reconstruct the presynaptic architecture. We predict that for a typical CA3-CA1 synapse, there are ~70 VDCCs located 300 nm from the active zone. This result is surprising, because structural studies on other synapses in the hippocampus report much tighter spatial coupling. We demonstrate that the unusual structure of this synapse reflects its functional role in short-term plasticity (STP).

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[14657]
    [14657]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
14658
    14658
  • Thumbnail: Page 
14659
    14659
  • Thumbnail: Page 
14660
    14660
  • Thumbnail: Page 
14661
    14661
  • Thumbnail: Page 
14662
    14662