Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

CYANOBACTERIA AND CYANOLICHENS: CAN THEY ENHANCE AVAILABILITY OF ESSENTIAL MINERALS FOR HIGHER PLANTS?

Kimball T. Harper and Rosemary L. Pendleton
The Great Basin Naturalist
Vol. 53, No. 1 (31 March 1993), pp. 59-72
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41712758
Page Count: 14
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
CYANOBACTERIA AND CYANOLICHENS: CAN THEY ENHANCE AVAILABILITY OF ESSENTIAL MINERALS FOR HIGHER PLANTS?
Preview not available

Abstract

In both field and greenhouse studies, cyanobacteria and cyanolichens of cold-temperate deserts often enhance growth and essential element uptake by associated herbs. That effect is associated with better seedling establishment and larger seedlings. The following are possible mechanisms for these effects: (1) the microbiota concentrate essential elements in available forms in soil surface layers, (2) the microbial surface covers are usually darker colored than the soil itself and produce warmer soils during cool seasons when soil water is most available, (3) the gelatinous sheaths of several cyanobacterial genera common on alkaline deserts contain chelating compounds, and (4) conditions that favor persistent microbial growths on soil surfaces also favor maintenance of larger populations of microorganisms that form mycorrhizal and/or rhizosheath associations with seed plants. There is evidence that associated animals maybe nutritionally benefited by the enhanced mineral content of forage plants growing in well-developed cyanobacterial crusts.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
59
    59
  • Thumbnail: Page 
60
    60
  • Thumbnail: Page 
61
    61
  • Thumbnail: Page 
62
    62
  • Thumbnail: Page 
63
    63
  • Thumbnail: Page 
64
    64
  • Thumbnail: Page 
65
    65
  • Thumbnail: Page 
66
    66
  • Thumbnail: Page 
67
    67
  • Thumbnail: Page 
68
    68
  • Thumbnail: Page 
69
    69
  • Thumbnail: Page 
70
    70
  • Thumbnail: Page 
71
    71
  • Thumbnail: Page 
72
    72