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FACTORS INFLUENCING FISH ASSEMBLAGES OF A HIGH-ELEVATION DESERT STREAM SYSTEM IN WYOMING

Bernard Carter and Wayne A. Hubert
The Great Basin Naturalist
Vol. 55, No. 2 (30 April 1995), pp. 169-173
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41712882
Page Count: 5
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
FACTORS INFLUENCING FISH ASSEMBLAGES OF A HIGH-ELEVATION DESERT STREAM SYSTEM IN WYOMING
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Abstract

Seven fish species were found in the Bitter Creek drainage of southwest Wyoming, but only speckled dace (Rhinichthys osculus), flannelmouth sucker (Catostomus latipinnis), and mountain sucker (Catostomus platyrhynchus) were indigenous. No relationships were found between fish standing stocks and habitat features, but species richness was related to elevation and stream width. No fish were found above an elevation of 2192 m. Only the most downstream study reach had more than three species present. Two indigenous species, speckled dace and mountain sucker, and a nonnative species, fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), were predominant fishes in the drainage. These three species withstand intermittent stream flows that are common in the drainage.

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