Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

COMPOSITION OF FOREST STANDS USED BY WHITE-HEADED WOODPECKERS FOR NESTING IN WASHINGTON

Jeffrey M. Kozma
Western North American Naturalist
Vol. 71, No. 1 (April 2011), pp. 1-9
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41718107
Page Count: 9
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
COMPOSITION OF FOREST STANDS USED BY WHITE-HEADED WOODPECKERS FOR NESTING IN WASHINGTON
Preview not available

Abstract

In this study, I examined the composition of managed ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forests used by nesting White-headed Woodpeckers (Picoides albolarvatus) along the eastern slope of the Cascade Range in Washington. I sampled trees and snags using the point-centered quarter method to assess species composition, tree and snag density, and stand basal area in 16 forest stands containing White-headed Woodpecker nests. All stands had a history of timber management and 2 had been burned and salvage-logged. Mean live-tree density (≥10.16 cm dbh) was 182.3 trees · ha⁻¹ (SE = 13.52), mean snag density (>10.16 cm dbh) was 11.5 snags · ha ⁻¹ (SE = 1.92), and mean stand basal area was 17.2 m² · ha⁻¹ (SE = 1.58). Ponderosa pine had the highest importance value ( $\bar x$ = 220.9, SE = 17.25) of any tree species in all but 2 stands. Mean dbh of ponderosa pines was 33.0 cm (SE = 0.26) and ranged from 26.1 to 50.2 cm within stands. Mean density of ponderosa pine was greatest in the 20.3-30.5 cm dbh size class and lowest in the 50.8-61.0 cm and >61.0 cm dbh size classes. Tree density was up to 5.3 times greater than densities believed to be typical of ponderosa pine forests prior to fire suppression. Snag densities were within the range estimated for historical dry forests of the eastern Cascades, yet only 50% of all snags sampled had a dbh >25.4 cm. Although White-headed Woodpeckers are considered strongly associated with old-growth ponderosa pine, my results suggest that they may be more adaptable to using forests dominated by smaller diameter trees. En este estudio, examiné la composición de los bosques manejados de pino ponderosa (Pinus ponderosa), utilizados para anidamiento por el pájaro carpintero cabeciblanco (Picoides albohrvatus), a lo largo de la vertiente oriental de la cordillera Cascade del Estado de Washington. Muestreé árboles vivos y muertos usando el método de cuadrantes al punto central en 16 rodales con nidos del pájaro carpintero cabeciblanco para evaluar la composición de especies, la densidad de árboles vivos y muertos y el área basal del rodal. Todas las áreas tenían una historia de manejo maderable y 2 habían sido quemadas y taladas para recuperar madera. La densidad promedio de árboles vivos (≥10.16 cm DAP) fue 182.3 árboles · ha⁻¹ (DE = 13.52), la densidad promedio de árboles muertos (≥10.16 cm DAP) fue 11.5 árboles muertos · ha⁻¹ (DE = 1.92) y el área basal promedio de los rodales fue 17.2 m² · ha⁻¹ (DE = 1.58). El pino ponderosa tuvo el valor de importancia más alto ( $\bar x$ = 220.9, DE = 17.25) de las especies de árboles en todos, menos 2 rodales. El DAP promedio de los pinos ponderosa fue 33.0 cm (DE = 0.26) y variaba de 26.1 a 50.2 cm dentro de rodales. La densidad promedio del pino ponderosa fue la mayor en la clase de 20.3-30.5 cm DAP y menor de las clases de 50.8-61.0 cm y >61.0 cm DAP. La densidad de árboles fue hasta 5.3 veces mayor que las consideradas típicas para bosques de pino ponderosa antes de la intervención para prevenir incendios. Las densidades de árboles muertos estuvo dentro del rango estimado para los bosques secos históricos del oriente de la cordillera Cascade, no obstante sólo 50% de los árboles muertos muestreados tuvieron un DAP >25.4 cm. Aunque se considera que los pájaros carpinteros cabeciblancos están estrechamente asociados con bosques primarios de pino ponderosa, mis resultados sugieren que podrían ser más adaptados a usar bosques donde predominan árboles de diámetro menor.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
1
    1
  • Thumbnail: Page 
2
    2
  • Thumbnail: Page 
3
    3
  • Thumbnail: Page 
4
    4
  • Thumbnail: Page 
5
    5
  • Thumbnail: Page 
6
    6
  • Thumbnail: Page 
7
    7
  • Thumbnail: Page 
8
    8
  • Thumbnail: Page 
9
    9