Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Critical period for acoustic preference in mice

Eun-Jin Yang, Eric W. Lin and Takao K. Hensch
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vol. 109, Supplement 2: Biological Embedding of Early Social Adversity: From Fruit Flies to Kindergartners (October 16, 2012), pp. 17213-17220
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41763515
Page Count: 8
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Critical period for acoustic preference in mice
Preview not available

Abstract

Preference behaviors are often established during early life, but the underlying neural circuit mechanisms remain unknown. Adapting a unique nesting behavior assay, we confirmed a "critical period" for developing music preference in C57BL/6 mice. Early music exposure between postnatal days 15 and 24 reversed their innate bias for silent shelter, which typically could not be altered in adulthood. Instead, exposing adult mice treated acutely with valproic acid or carrying a targeted deletion of the Nogo receptor (NgR -/- ) unmasked a strong plasticity of preference consistent with a reopening of the critical period as seen in other systems. Imaging of cFos expression revealed a prominent neuronal activation in response to the exposed music in the prelimbic and infralimbic medial prefrontal cortex only under conditions of open plasticity. Neither behavioral changes nor selective medial prefrontal cortex activation was observed in response to pure tone exposure, indicating a music-specific effect. Open-field center crossings were increased concomitant with shifts in music preference, suggesting a potential anxiolytic effect. Thus, music may offer both a unique window into the emotional state of mice and a potentially efficient assay for molecular "brakes" on critical period plasticity common to sensory and higher order brain areas.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[17213]
    [17213]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
17214
    17214
  • Thumbnail: Page 
17215
    17215
  • Thumbnail: Page 
17216
    17216
  • Thumbnail: Page 
17217
    17217
  • Thumbnail: Page 
17218
    17218
  • Thumbnail: Page 
17219
    17219
  • Thumbnail: Page 
17220
    17220