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Impact of Skin Color upon Occupational Projection: A Case for Black Male Affirmative Action

Ronald E. Hall
Journal of African American Men
Vol. 1, No. 4 (Spring 1996), pp. 87-94
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41819291
Page Count: 8
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Impact of Skin Color upon Occupational Projection: A Case for Black Male Affirmative Action
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Abstract

The recent attacks upon Affirmative Action in the workplace infer that merit should be the sole criterion for employment Policies designed to compensate for past discriminatory practices are themselves considered discriminatory and to suggest minorities are inferior. In fact, a complex system of cultural norms precedes the influence of merit For African American males one such norm is skin color. The present study was undertaken to determine the implications of skin color for the workplace. The data showed a significant relationship between light skin and aspiration to prestigious occupations.

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