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The Importance of Overt Responding in Programmed Instruction Even with Added Incentives for Learning

Matthew L. Miller and Richard W. Malott
Journal of Behavioral Education
Vol. 7, No. 4 (December 1997), pp. 497-503
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41824199
Page Count: 7
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The Importance of Overt Responding in Programmed Instruction Even with Added Incentives for Learning
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Abstract

Among the fundamental tenets of programmed instruction is the requirement of overt responding. Past research has not determined when this tenet holds true. We systematically replicated the work of Tudor (1995) by showing that overt responding in computer-based instruction improves learning, even when there is an incentive that might be thought to improve learning enough to mask the effect of overt responding. Subjects were exposed to both read-only and overt-response materials. One group received course-related, bonus points based on posttest performance, whereas the other group received points simply for participation. Within-subject comparison showed greater performance increases when overt responding was required, regardless of the point incentive. No significant differences were found between groups.

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