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GOOD GOVERNANCE, MORAL ECONOMY, AND THE SHIFT FROM SECULAR STATE CLASSES TO CULTURAL-IDENTITARIAN POLITICAL MOVEMENTS IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES

Hartmut Elsenhans
The Indian Journal of Political Science
Vol. 65, No. 4 (Oct.-Dec., 2004), pp. 469-498
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41856072
Page Count: 30
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
GOOD GOVERNANCE, MORAL ECONOMY, AND THE SHIFT FROM SECULAR STATE CLASSES TO CULTURAL-IDENTITARIAN POLITICAL MOVEMENTS IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES
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Abstract

With the decline of the "bureaucracies" in charge of state-led import-substituting industrialisation a demand for administrative reform emerges, often with the argument that it is necessary to ease the financial crises of the state in the underdeveloped world. However, the concepts of administrative reform are imprecise and the administrative reforms realized are particularly weak in countries where the secularly oriented political movements have been replaced by new cultural ideniitarian movements. These movements are on the rise where import-substituting industrialisation did not completely fail, where the link between internal markets and the industrialisation process has in principal been established, but where this link has not led to high levels of employment through a shift to the export of manufactured goods. New cultural identitarian political movements are simultaneously committed to more economic liberalisation, a greater opening to the world market, and the promotion of small and medium-scale industries. The old bureaucracies and new cultural indentitarian movements face basically the same challenge in the management of rents. The solution consists neither in the return to Weberian administration, as it would not measure up to the task of promoting economic and social development for taming the rent, nor in the introduction of new public management concepts, which decisively enlarge the scope of intervention for administration without the concomitant introduction of mechanisms of control. Administrative reform works best once the transition to self-sustained growth has been achieved, in most cases after considerable employment increases in exportoriented manufacturing and the empowerment of labour. Because neo-classical concepts do not work before this goal is achieved, new cultural identitarian political movements are a new answer to the challenges of transition to welfare-based capitalism based on moral economy and may be a powerful instrument for establishing economic equilibria based on values of equality sanctioned by cultural tradition.

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