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Three Sources of Creativity

Arthur W. Munk
Social Science
Vol. 40, No. 4 (OCTOBER 1965), pp. 203-207
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41885106
Page Count: 5
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Three Sources of Creativity
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Abstract

Creativity signifies meaningful and significant novelties. Nature, by virtue of its vastness, its order, its beauty, and its challenges to man, constitutes a source of creativity. Man himself, however, in terms of his higher capacities, represents a higher source of creativity. Yet, if man is to develop and to become creative, he needs the kind of society which is most conducive to the development of his potentialities. An attempt is made here to suggest the chief characteristics of such a creative society.

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