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American Reactions to the Beilis Case Frederick C. Giffin

Frederick C. Giffin
Social Science
Vol. 55, No. 2 (SPRING 1980), pp. 89-93
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41886517
Page Count: 5
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
American Reactions to the Beilis Case Frederick C. Giffin
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Abstract

The Beilis case, which has more than once been called Russia's Dreyfus Affair, was a celebrated ritual murder trial during the reign of Tsar Nicholas II. The basis for Bernard Malamud's novel, The Fixer, it was part of the tradition of previous cases in which Russian anti-Semites from time to time used the unexplained disappearance or death of a Christian to attempt to gain credence for the ancient superstition that Jews murdered Christians to obtain the tetter's blood for ritual purposes. Earlier "blood accusations" had collapsed for lack of evidence. But enemies of the Jews were not dissuaded by lack of success.

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