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Sociolinguistic Effects on Code-Switched Ads Targeting Bilingual Consumers

David Luna and Laura A. Peracchio
Journal of Advertising
Vol. 34, No. 2 (Summer, 2005), pp. 43-56
Published by: Taylor & Francis, Ltd.
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4189296
Page Count: 14
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Sociolinguistic Effects on Code-Switched Ads Targeting Bilingual Consumers
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Abstract

One of the techniques advertisers use to target language minorities (e.g., U.S. Hispanics) is the use of code-switching, or mixing languages within one ad. This paper investigates the consequences of code-switching for ad persuasiveness. The results of two studies suggest that code-switching results in the activation of associations relevant to the language the slogan switches to. Those associations influence the valence of consumers' elaboration such that if the language a slogan switches to possesses positive (negative) associations, consumers engage in positive (negative) elaboration, resulting in higher (lower) evaluations. Attitudinal and contextual variables interact with the effect of code-switching on ad responses.

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