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"Kamishibai" as Propaganda in Wartime Japan

Emily Horner
Storytelling, Self, Society
Vol. 2, No. 1 (FALL 2005), pp. 21-31
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41948951
Page Count: 11
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
"Kamishibai" as Propaganda in Wartime Japan
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Abstract

Kamishibai is a form of picture storytelling that evolved in Japan at the beginning of the twentieth century. With the coming of World War II, it became one of the most widely used mediums for propaganda, targeting both children on the homefront and newly colonized nations. This paper examines some of the types of wartime kamishibai, and the ideologies of the warrior code and the "nationstate as family" that pervaded them, within the context of the history of kamishibai as a whole.

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