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Technology Growth in India—Some Important Concerns

DURU ARUN KUMAR
Polish Sociological Review
No. 178 (2012), pp. 295-302
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41969446
Page Count: 8
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Technology Growth in India—Some Important Concerns
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Abstract

Technology has made its presence felt in various sectors of India's development in the last twenty years. Communication and information technology, manufacturing industry, transportation, defence and space technologies are some of the important sectors which have incorporated modern technology in various aspects of their development and functioning. Also significant and visible changes have taken place in the consumer products available in the Indian market, most of them imported or locally manufactured by multinational corporations based in India. Do these changes qualify India to be considered as a technologically advanced country, and thereby making technological changes an integral part of the social change process of our society? Or are these developments restricted to certain elitist sections of society with little or negligible trickle-down effect of the knowledge bases of the technology developments? In this study a deconstructivist approach is adopted to analyse some of the processes involved in development and diffusion of technology in a society. With the exception of mobile phone technology it is argued that even though India has strong scientific and technological capabilities, it is emerging as a bigger consumer of technology products than as a producer and innovator of modern technology.

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