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The Jewish Aged of Hamilton: Report of a Survey

Eugene Vayda, Marjorie S. Baskin, Charles H. Goldsmith and Christina Gordon
Canadian Journal of Public Health / Revue Canadienne de Santé Publique
Vol. 63, No. 5 (September/October 1972), pp. 414-423
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41985657
Page Count: 10
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Jewish Aged of Hamilton: Report of a Survey
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Abstract

A survey of a 50 per cent simple random sample of the Jewish population of Hamilton over age 60 was carried out in March and April, 1971. The survey characterized the social, physical, functional, and financial status of this group. In addition, it obtained data to help the Hamilton Council of Jewish Organizations decide whether or not a residential home should be built for older Jewish residents of Hamilton on the grounds of a chronic disease hospital. The study was car' ried out under the terms of reference of the Regional Service Program of the Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics of the Faculty of Medicine of McMaster University, a program which provides consultation and methodologie assistance to community groups as they undertake program development or short-term health care studies. Generally speaking, the function and status of the over age 60 group was good. However, approximately 11 per cent were found to have significant needs relating to isolation, disability, or aging. Major problems of aging seemed to occur, in the interviewed sample, mainly after age 75 and not at age 65. Because of the small Jewish population of Hamilton (over age 60), and because of their lack of interest in a residential home for Jews alone, questions were raised concerning the advisability of building such a home. Other needs were identified which may serve as a basis for program development, an increase in certain social and community services, and case finding activities.

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