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The Vanishing Chronic: The Reduction of the Resident Patient Population of a Large Urban Ontario Mental Hospital from 1950 to 1970 with an Analysis of Associated Administrative and Therapeutic Changes

F. A. Allodi and H. B. Kedward
Canadian Journal of Public Health / Revue Canadienne de Santé Publique
Vol. 64, No. 3 (May / June 1973), pp. 279-289
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41987982
Page Count: 11
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
The Vanishing Chronic: The Reduction of the Resident Patient Population of a Large Urban Ontario Mental Hospital from 1950 to 1970 with an Analysis of Associated Administrative and Therapeutic Changes
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Abstract

The reduction of the inpatient population of a mental hospital in Toronto for the years between 1950 and 1970 is analyzed in the light of the changes in policy and legislation in the Province of Ontario. Other factors are included in the analysis: changes in institutional philosophy and in treatment patterns, changes in the numbers of staff and the alternatives to hospitalization available to patients living outside the hospital as represented by rehabilitation, welfare and residential homes programs. The trend to inpatient population reduction is discussed in view of the growing evidence both in Canada and the United Kingdom that the discharged chronic mental patients have not always found adequate support services outside the hospital. L'auteur analyse la réduction du nombre des patients hospitalisés dans un hôpital mental de Toronto entre 1950 et 1970, à la lumière des changements de politique ou de législation adoptés dans la province de l'Ontario. Il fait aussi intervenir dans son analyse d'autres facteurs: changements dans la philosophie institutionnelle et dans les modalités de traitement, changements dans la quantité du personnel et dans les alternatives à l'hospitalisation offertes aux patients vivant à l'extérieur de l'hôpital, tels que les programmes de réhabilitation, de bien-être et de soins à domicile. L'auteur considère également la tendance à réduire le nombre des patients hospitalisés alors qu'il semble de plus en plus, au Canada et en Grande-Bretagne, que les malades mentaux chroniques qui quittent l'hôpital ne bénéficient pas toujours de services auxiliaires suffisants à l'extérieur.

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