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Perceived Neighbourhood Correlates of Walking Among Participants Visiting the "Canada on the Move" Website

John C. Spence, Ronald C. Plotnikoff, Liza S. Rovniak, Kathleen A. Martin Ginis, Wendy Rodgers and Scott A. Lear
Canadian Journal of Public Health / Revue Canadienne de Santé Publique
Vol. 97, SUPPLEMENT 1: Canada on the Move (MARCH/APRIL 2006), pp. S36-S40
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41994630
Page Count: 5
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Perceived Neighbourhood Correlates of Walking Among Participants Visiting the "Canada on the Move" Website
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Abstract

Background: The purposes of this study were to: 1) explore the potential role of sex in the association between the perceived environment and walking; and 2) determine the efficacy of an Internet-based research platform for collecting population-level physical activity and correlates data. Methods: Visitors to the Canada on the Move website were asked questions about their demographics, physical activity participation and perceptions of their neighbourhood environment. A total of 3,144 Canadians (2,036 women; 609 men) completed the survey. Level of walking was regressed on eight measures of perceived neighbourhood environment in a series of logistic regressions. Results: Individuals who reported interesting scenery (OR=1.41, 95% CI 1.17-1.71 ) and many places to go that were within easy walking distance (OR=1.39, 95% CI 1.18-1.64) were more likely to report walking at a level sufficient to derive health benefits. For women, interesting scenery in and around their neighbourhood (OR=1.40, 95% CI 1.13-1.74) and the presence of many places to go within easy walking distance (OR=1.42, 95% CI 1.17-1.72) were associated with walking at a sufficient level. Among men, no significant associations were found between the perceived environment measures and walking. Conclusions: The results from this study provide additional support for the use of models in which sex is treated as a potential moderator of the link between the perceived environment and physical activity. Further, the results support the use of an Internet-based research platform to collect data on the correlates of physical activity.

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