If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

A Simple Simulation Model of Dispersal of Animals among Units of Discrete Habitats

Roger Kitching
Oecologia
Vol. 7, No. 2 (1971), pp. 95-116
Published by: Springer in cooperation with International Association for Ecology
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4214666
Page Count: 22
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
A Simple Simulation Model of Dispersal of Animals among Units of Discrete Habitats
Preview not available

Abstract

A simple simulation model of dispersal of animals among units of discrete habitats has been constructed. This model outputs the numbers of animals reaching each of twenty-five "habitats" at preselected loci in a grid under a variety of operating conditions. These conditions consist of variables controlling directionality, velocity and mortality during dispersal. The relationship between numbers of animals reaching a particular site and the distance of that site from the starting point was investigated. Similarly, the effects of directionality (as determined by the variance of the normal distribution used to assign directions of movement), mortality and velocity on the overall rate of success were studied. A negative exponential-type drop off in numbers of animals reaching a site was predicted with increasing distance from the starting point. The relationship between percent success, directionality and rate of mortality was predicted to be curvilinear; the percentage declining with decreased directionality and increased mortality. A positive linear relationship was indicated between the spatial displacement per iteration used and percent success. Wherever possible the assumptions and predictions of the model are compared with available data. The assumptions concerning initial and subsequent directions of movement were found to be borne out by the data examined as were the results showing the relationship between numbers at each site and distance from starting point. The other results of the simulations were more difficult to compare with available data and some of these remain to be tested. The advantages and disadvantages of the model and the prospects for its expansion are discussed. It is concluded that the model is simplistic but that this gives it a generality and versatility which make it a useful tool for further thinking and investigation on the process of dispersal.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[95]
    [95]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
96
    96
  • Thumbnail: Page 
97
    97
  • Thumbnail: Page 
98
    98
  • Thumbnail: Page 
99
    99
  • Thumbnail: Page 
100
    100
  • Thumbnail: Page 
101
    101
  • Thumbnail: Page 
102
    102
  • Thumbnail: Page 
103
    103
  • Thumbnail: Page 
104
    104
  • Thumbnail: Page 
105
    105
  • Thumbnail: Page 
106
    106
  • Thumbnail: Page 
107
    107
  • Thumbnail: Page 
108
    108
  • Thumbnail: Page 
109
    109
  • Thumbnail: Page 
110
    110
  • Thumbnail: Page 
111
    111
  • Thumbnail: Page 
112
    112
  • Thumbnail: Page 
113
    113
  • Thumbnail: Page 
114
    114
  • Thumbnail: Page 
115
    115
  • Thumbnail: Page 
116
    116