Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Arctic Tundra: A Source or Sink for Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide in a Changing Environment?

W. D. Billings, J. O. Luken, D. A. Mortensen and K. M. Peterson
Oecologia
Vol. 53, No. 1 (1982), pp. 7-11
Published by: Springer in cooperation with International Association for Ecology
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4216641
Page Count: 5
  • Download ($43.95)
  • Cite this Item
If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Arctic Tundra: A Source or Sink for Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide in a Changing Environment?
Preview not available

Abstract

Intact cores from the wet coastal arctic tundra at Barrow, Alaska, were used as microcosms in the measurement of CO₂ fluxes between peat, vegetation, and atmosphere under controlled conditions. Net ecosystem CO₂ uptake was almost twice as high at present summer temperatures (4° C) than at 8°. Lowering the water table from the soil surface to -5 cm also had a pronounced effect in decreasing net ecosystem carbon storage. Warming of the tundra climate could change this ecosystem from a sink for atmospheric CO₂ to a source.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[7]
    [7]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
8
    8
  • Thumbnail: Page 
9
    9
  • Thumbnail: Page 
10
    10
  • Thumbnail: Page 
11
    11