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Review: Elusive Synergy: Business-Government Relations and Development

Reviewed Works: Embedded Autonomy: States and Industrial Transformation by Peter Evans; The State and Capital in Chile: Business Elites, Technocrats, and Market Economics by Eduardo Silva; Big Business and the Wealth of Nations by Alfred Chandler, Franco Amatori, Takahashi Hikino
Review by: Ben Ross Schneider
Comparative Politics
Vol. 31, No. 1 (Oct., 1998), pp. 101-122
DOI: 10.2307/422108
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/422108
Page Count: 22
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Elusive Synergy: Business-Government Relations and Development
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Abstract

Studies of development have increasingly come to the conclusion that close collaboration between business and government accelerates growth. The concepts of embedded autonomy and reciprocity help characterize the close relations that improve the effectiveness of the developmental state. However, they require elaboration and empirical substantiation. It has been argued that effective collaboration depends on coherent states and large diversified conglomerates or encompassing business associations. The state is a major protagonist in the development of conglomerates and organized capitalism. Statist arguments have advantages over societal approaches, which tend to make unwarranted assumptions about business preferences and capacity for collective action.

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