If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support

Politics, Professionalism, and Peacekeeping: An Analysis of the 1987 Military Coup in Fiji

Andrew Scobell
Comparative Politics
Vol. 26, No. 2 (Jan., 1994), pp. 187-201
DOI: 10.2307/422267
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/422267
Page Count: 15
  • Download PDF
  • Cite this Item

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If you need an accessible version of this item please contact JSTOR User Support
Politics, Professionalism, and Peacekeeping: An Analysis of the 1987 Military Coup in Fiji
Preview not available

Abstract

Ethnic conflict, class conflict, and conspiracy theories are inadequate in explaining the May 1987 military coup in the Pacific island state of Fiji. The coup is best explained in terms of civil-military relations, specifically, by an army's effort to protect its institutional interests. The case of Fiji demonstrates the explanatory power of a composite approach to understanding military intervention. It cautions against simplistically attributing political crises to ethnic tensions, highlights the importance of consulation with the military in moves to slash defense spending, and raises fundamental questions about the impact of peacekeeping duties on soldiers.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
187
    187
  • Thumbnail: Page 
188
    188
  • Thumbnail: Page 
189
    189
  • Thumbnail: Page 
190
    190
  • Thumbnail: Page 
191
    191
  • Thumbnail: Page 
192
    192
  • Thumbnail: Page 
193
    193
  • Thumbnail: Page 
194
    194
  • Thumbnail: Page 
195
    195
  • Thumbnail: Page 
196
    196
  • Thumbnail: Page 
197
    197
  • Thumbnail: Page 
198
    198
  • Thumbnail: Page 
199
    199
  • Thumbnail: Page 
200
    200
  • Thumbnail: Page 
201
    201