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Science Fiction as Creative Revisionism: The Example of Alfred Bester's "The Stars My Destination" (La SF comme révisionnisme créateur: l'exemple d'Alfred Bester, "The Stars My Destination")

Patrick A. McCarthy
Science Fiction Studies
Vol. 10, No. 1 (Mar., 1983), pp. 58-69
Published by: SF-TH Inc
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4239528
Page Count: 12
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Science Fiction as Creative Revisionism: The Example of Alfred Bester's "The Stars My Destination" (La SF comme révisionnisme créateur: l'exemple d'Alfred Bester, "The Stars My Destination")
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Abstract

Dans ce roman de 1956, Bester développe sa thématique apocalyptique à travers de nombreuses allusions à toute une série d'oeuvres littéraires. Parmi elles, on rencontre surtout la référence au Dédalus de James Joyce et au poème de William Blake "le Tigre". Les allusions à Blake sont si nombreuses que le roman de Bester peut être compris comme une interprétation révisionniste, comme une ré-vision, du poème de Blake. L'examen de la thématique du tigre chez Bester conduit à une exégèse blakéenne des conclusions du récit et montre dans quelle mesure les conceptions romantiques de l'imaginaire humaine en déterminent l'action. /// In The Stars My Destination (1956), Alfred Bester advances his novel's apocalyptic themes partly through numerous allusions to a variety of literary works. Of these, the most important seem to be the references to James Joyce's A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man and to William Blake's poem "The Tyger." References to Blake are in fact so pervasive the The Stars might be understood as a revisionary interpretation of "The Tyger." An examination of the tiger motif in The Stars leads to a Blakean interpretation of the novel's conclusion and demonstrates the extent to which Romantic assumptions about the human imagination determine the action of Bester's narrative.

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