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Anti-Communism and Ambivalence in "Red Planet Mars, Invasion USA", and "The Beast of Yucca Flats"

Cyndy Hendershot
Science Fiction Studies
Vol. 28, No. 2 (Jul., 2001), pp. 246-260
Published by: SF-TH Inc
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4240980
Page Count: 15
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Anti-Communism and Ambivalence in
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Abstract

I focus on representations of the "Communist threat" in three sf B-films-Harry Horner's "Red Planet Mars" (1952), Alfred E. Green's "Invasion USA" (1952), and Coleman Francis's "The Beast of Yucca Flats" (1961). Rather than using metaphors such as alien invaders or giant insects (like so many films of that era), all three directly address Communism, using it as an important element in their plots. Yet while each invokes the threat of a dangerous Soviet enemy, each also raises the possibility that internal conflicts in the United States allow that threat to flourish, holding up a mirror to US flaws and weaknesses.

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