Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

Relative Nutritional Value of Ciliate Protozoa and Algae as Food for Daphnia

A. E. DeBiase, R. W. Sanders and K. G. Porter
Microbial Ecology
Vol. 19, No. 2 (Mar. - Apr., 1990), pp. 199-210
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4251114
Page Count: 12
  • Download ($43.95)
  • Cite this Item
Relative Nutritional Value of Ciliate Protozoa and Algae as Food for Daphnia
Preview not available

Abstract

The relative importance of autotrophic flagellates, desmids, cyanobacteria, and ciliates as food for Daphnia magna was examined using cohort life tables. Each cohort was fed a single food type at a given concentration, and comparisons among each type were made. Algal feeding treatments included three levels of young (7 to 14 days old) Chlamydomonas reinhardi (Chlorophyta, Chlamydomonadacae), two levels of senescent (> 14 days old) C. reinhardi, two levels of Cryptomonas sp. (Chlorophyta, Cryptomonadacae), two levels of Staurastrum sp. (Chlorophyta, Desmidacae), four levels of young (7 to 15 days old) or senescent (> 15 days old) Microcystis aeruginosa (Cyanophyta, Chlorococcacae), and a no-food treatment. The ciliates Cyclidium sp. and Paramecium caudatum were also presented at concentrations of 1 or 102 cells/ml, as well as mixtures of C. reinhardi (103/ml) and Cyclidium (1/ml) or P. caudatum (1/ml). Daphnia growth, reproduction, and survivorship were highest when C. reinhardi or Cryptomonas were the food source, while those starved or fed M. aeruginosa had shorter survivorship and lower growth and reproduction. Daphnia grew and had high survivorship when fed P. caudatum, but even though eggs were produced, most were aborted after 2 or 3 days. Staurastrum and Cyclidium produced intermediate growth and survivorship, but reproduction was seen only in the 103 Staurastrum/ml treatment. Carbon and nitrogen content were general indicators of nutritional value. However, growth, reproduction, and survivorship were higher in some cohorts fed treatments containing relatively low levels of carbon and nitrogen. Other cohorts were short-lived and did not reproduce, despite being fed much higher levels of carbon and nitrogen. The results also suggest that green algae are nutritionally valuable for Daphnia, whereas cyanobacteria are not. As measured by life-table parameters, the nutritional value of ciliates was variable, with some being poor food sources. Thus, the potential of ciliates as a trophic link between microbial production and higher trophic levels may vary with the ciliate community structure. Our results suggest that ciliates alone were insufficient as a food source to support Daphnia population growth.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[199]
    [199]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
200
    200
  • Thumbnail: Page 
201
    201
  • Thumbnail: Page 
202
    202
  • Thumbnail: Page 
203
    203
  • Thumbnail: Page 
204
    204
  • Thumbnail: Page 
205
    205
  • Thumbnail: Page 
206
    206
  • Thumbnail: Page 
207
    207
  • Thumbnail: Page 
208
    208
  • Thumbnail: Page 
209
    209
  • Thumbnail: Page 
210
    210