Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

The Presence, Nature, and Role of Gut Microflora in Aquatic Invertebrates: A Synthesis

Jean M. Harris
Microbial Ecology
Vol. 25, No. 3 (May - Jun., 1993), pp. 195-231
Published by: Springer
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4251295
Page Count: 37
  • Download ($43.95)
  • Cite this Item
The Presence, Nature, and Role of Gut Microflora in Aquatic Invertebrates: A Synthesis
Preview not available

Abstract

This review of the literature concerns the gut microbiota of aquatic invertebrates and highlights the questions and processes that merit attention if an understanding of the role of gut microbes in the physiology of host invertebrates and nutrient dynamics of aquatic systems is to be gained. A substantial number of studies report the presence of gut microbes in aquatic invertebrates. Crustacea, Mollusca, and Echinodermata have received the most attention, with few studies involving other invertebrate groups. Different types of associations (e.g., ingestion, contribution of exoenzymes, incubation, parasitism) are reported to occur between gut microbes and aquatic invertebrates, and it is clear that gut bacterial communities cannot be treated as single functional entities, but that individual populations require examination. In addition, gut microbes may be either ingested transients or residents, the presence of which have different implications for the invertebrate. The most commonly reported genera of gut bacteria are Vibrio, Pseudomonas, Flavobacterium, Micrococcus, and Aeromonas. Quite a number of authors report the physiological properties of gut microbes (including enzyme activities and attributes such as nitrogen fixation), while less attention has been given to consideration of the colonization sites within the digestive tract, the density and turnover of gut bacteria, and the factors affecting the presence and nature of gut microflora. In addition, although a few studies have demonstrated a positive relationship between invertebrates and their gut microbiota, particularly with regard to nutrient gain by the invertebrate, very little conclusive evidence exists as to the role of bacteria in the physiology of host invertebrates. This has resulted from a lack of process-oriented studies. The findings for aquatic gut microbes are compared to those of gut bacteria associated with terrestrial invertebrates, where gut microbes contribute significantly to nutrient gain by the host in some environments.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[195]
    [195]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
196
    196
  • Thumbnail: Page 
197
    197
  • Thumbnail: Page 
198
    198
  • Thumbnail: Page 
199
    199
  • Thumbnail: Page 
200
    200
  • Thumbnail: Page 
201
    201
  • Thumbnail: Page 
202
    202
  • Thumbnail: Page 
203
    203
  • Thumbnail: Page 
204
    204
  • Thumbnail: Page 
205
    205
  • Thumbnail: Page 
206
    206
  • Thumbnail: Page 
207
    207
  • Thumbnail: Page 
208
    208
  • Thumbnail: Page 
209
    209
  • Thumbnail: Page 
210
    210
  • Thumbnail: Page 
211
    211
  • Thumbnail: Page 
212
    212
  • Thumbnail: Page 
213
    213
  • Thumbnail: Page 
214
    214
  • Thumbnail: Page 
215
    215
  • Thumbnail: Page 
216
    216
  • Thumbnail: Page 
217
    217
  • Thumbnail: Page 
218
    218
  • Thumbnail: Page 
219
    219
  • Thumbnail: Page 
220
    220
  • Thumbnail: Page 
221
    221
  • Thumbnail: Page 
222
    222
  • Thumbnail: Page 
223
    223
  • Thumbnail: Page 
224
    224
  • Thumbnail: Page 
225
    225
  • Thumbnail: Page 
226
    226
  • Thumbnail: Page 
227
    227
  • Thumbnail: Page 
228
    228
  • Thumbnail: Page 
229
    229
  • Thumbnail: Page 
230
    230
  • Thumbnail: Page 
231
    231