Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Ethnobotany of Chia, Salvia hispanica L. (Lamiaceae)

Joseph P. Cahill
Economic Botany
Vol. 57, No. 4 (Winter, 2003), pp. 604-618
Published by: Springer on behalf of New York Botanical Garden Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4256743
Page Count: 15
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Ethnobotany of Chia, Salvia hispanica L. (Lamiaceae)
Preview not available

Abstract

Salvia hispanica L., was an important staple Mesoamerican food and medicinal plant in pre-Columbian times. Unlike other Mesoamerican pseudocereal crops such as Amaranthus and Chenopodium, it has received comparatively little research attention. An ethnobotanical review of this Mesoamerican crop plant Salvia hispanica has been undertaken to examine changes in use accompanying Spanish colonization. A comparative analysis of accounts of use from the 16th century codices of Mexico and subsequent publications has revealed subtle changes in medicinal, culinary, artistic, and religious uses. Several hypotheses surrounding changes in use through time and the original use(s) that led to domestication are developed and tested through collection of ethnobotanical data in the highlands of western Mexico and Guatemala. A general decline in ethnobotanical knowledge associated with wild populations coupled with a loss of habitat in some locations has degraded important germplasm and knowledge resources for a species with great economic potential. /// En contraste con otras cultivos de pseudocereales de Mesoamérica, como Amaranthus y Chenopodium, pocas investigaciones se han realizado sobre Salvia hispanica L., a pesar de la importancia que tuvo esta especie como una planta comestible y medicinal en el periodo Pre-Colombino. Se realizó una revision etnobotánica de la especie mesoamericana Salvia hispanica para analizar los cambios en uso que acompañaron a la colonización española. Se presentan tablas con las descripciones de usos de códices del siglo XVI y publicaciones subsecuentes que muestran cambios sutiles en los usos medicinales, culinarios, artísticos, y religiosos. Se propusieron varias hipótesis relativas a los cambios en su uso a través del tiempo y su uso original; estas hipótesis se probaron con una colección de datos etnobotánicos obtenidos en las montañas del oeste de México y Guatemala. La pérdida progresiva del conocimiento etnobotánico de las poblaciones silvestres, asociada con la pérdida del habitat en algunos sitios, ha provocado una degradación tanto de importantes recursos genéticos como del conocimiento de una especie con un gran potencial económico.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[604]
    [604]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
605
    605
  • Thumbnail: Page 
606
    606
  • Thumbnail: Page 
607
    607
  • Thumbnail: Page 
608
    608
  • Thumbnail: Page 
609
    609
  • Thumbnail: Page 
610
    610
  • Thumbnail: Page 
611
    611
  • Thumbnail: Page 
612
    612
  • Thumbnail: Page 
613
    613
  • Thumbnail: Page 
614
    614
  • Thumbnail: Page 
615
    615
  • Thumbnail: Page 
616
    616
  • Thumbnail: Page 
617
    617
  • Thumbnail: Page 
618
    618