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Enzymes of the Glyoxylate Cycle in Rhizobia and Nodules of Legumes

Gordon V. Johnson, Harold J. Evans and TeMay Ching
Plant Physiology
Vol. 41, No. 8 (Oct., 1966), pp. 1330-1336
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4260837
Page Count: 7
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Enzymes of the Glyoxylate Cycle in Rhizobia and Nodules of Legumes
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Abstract

The relatively high level of fatty acids in soybean nodules and rhizobia from soybean nodules suggested that the glyoxylate cycle might have a role in nodule metabolism. Several species of rhizobia in pure culture were found to have malate synthetase activity when grown on a number of different carbon sources. Significant isocitrate lyase activity was induced when oleate, which presumably may act as an acetyl CoA precursor, was utilized as the principle carbon source. Malate synthetase was active in extracts of rhizobia from nodules of bush bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), cowpea (Vigna sinensis L.), lupine (Lupinus angustifolius L.) and soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.). Activity of malate synthetase was, however, barely detectable in rhizobia from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) and pea (Pisum sativum L.) nodules. Appreciable isocitrate lyase activity was not detected in rhizobia from nodules nor was it induced by depletion of endogenous substrates by incubation of excised bush bean nodules. Although rhizobia has the potential for the formation of the key enzymes of the glyoxylate cycle, the absence of isocitrate lyase activity in bacteria isolated from nodules indicated that the glyoxylate cycle does not operate in the symbiotic growth of rhizobia and that the observed high content of fatty acids in nodules and nodule bacteria probably is related to a structural role.

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