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Glycolate Pathway in Green Algae

W. J. Bruin, Edward B. Nelson and N. E. Tolbert
Plant Physiology
Vol. 46, No. 3 (Sep., 1970), pp. 386-391
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4262183
Page Count: 6
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Glycolate Pathway in Green Algae
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Abstract

By three criteria, the glycolate pathway of metabolism is present in unicellular green algae. Exogenous glycolate-1-14C was assimilated and metabolized to glycine-1-14C and serine-1-14C. During photosynthetic 14CO2 fixation the distributions of 14C in glycolate and glycine were similar enough to suggest a product-precursor relationship. Five enzymes associated with the glycolate pathway were present in algae grown on air. These were P-glycolate phosphatase, glycolate dehydrogenase (glycolate:dichloroindophenol oxidoreductase), L-glutamate:glyoxylate aminotransferase, serine hydroxymethylase, and glycerate dehydrogenase. Properties of glycerate dehydrogenase and the aminotransferase were similar to those from leaf peroxisomes. The specific activity of glycolate dehydrogenase and serine hydroxymethylase in algae was 1/5 to 1/10 that of the other enzymes, and both these enzymes appear rate-limiting for the glycolate pathway. Labeling patterns for products of the glycolate pathway during 14CO2 fixation are not the same as those obtained with higher plants. In higher plants glycolate, glycine, and serine are uniformly labeled at shortest time periods. In algae, serine was predominately carboxyl-labeled, similarly to 3-phosphoglycerate. This result, plus the lower specific activity of serine hydroxymethylase, indicates that the glycine-serine interconversion in algae is slower than in plants. Initially (2 to 4 seconds) glycolate and glycine were more C-2 labeled. They rapidly became uniformly labeled, with glycine becoming uniformly labeled first. In the presence of isonicotinylhydrazide, labeled glycolate and glycine accumulated, and only a trace of serine-14C was detected. Then glycolate and glycine were initially carboxyl-labeled, and glycolate became uniformly labeled almost immediately and before glycine. These results suggest rapid metabolism of glycolate and glycine, in addition to the glycolate pathway.

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