Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Multiple Forms of Invertase in Developing Oat Internodes

Richard A. Jones and Peter B. Kaufman
Plant Physiology
Vol. 55, No. 1 (Jan., 1975), pp. 114-119
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4263881
Page Count: 6
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Multiple Forms of Invertase in Developing Oat Internodes
Preview not available

Abstract

Three different invertases are found in the developing internodes of oat (Avena sativa cv. Victory). Two soluble invertases (I and II) are separable on diethylaminoethylcellulose and Sephadex columns. They are further distinguished by their kinetic constants, heat stability, and differences in stability and apparent activity optima in response to pH treatments. Relative activities of the two soluble isozymes change considerably during the developmental stages examined. Invertase I activity rises early and begins to fall after maximal activity is reached at 6 hours of incubation. This early increase in activity accompanies the period of most rapid growth rate of the internode. Invertase II activity does not increase significantly during the first 6 hours of internode extension, but rapidly rises to a maximum activity at 16 hours, then declines. The third form of invertase, bound invertase (III), is present in both immature and mature stem tissue. Its activity increases (by 6 hours) during immature growth stages, decreases considerably with maturation, and remains relatively constant in mature tissue.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
114
    114
  • Thumbnail: Page 
115
    115
  • Thumbnail: Page 
116
    116
  • Thumbnail: Page 
117
    117
  • Thumbnail: Page 
118
    118
  • Thumbnail: Page 
119
    119