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Physiology of Tuberization in Solanum tuberosum L.: cis-Zeatin Riboside in the Potato Plant: Its Identification and Changes in Endogenous Levels as Influenced by Temperature and Photoperiod

Craighton S. Mauk and Alan R. Langille
Plant Physiology
Vol. 62, No. 3 (Sep., 1978), pp. 438-442
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4265454
Page Count: 5
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Physiology of Tuberization in Solanum tuberosum L.: cis-Zeatin Riboside in the Potato Plant: Its Identification and Changes in Endogenous Levels as Influenced by Temperature and Photoperiod
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Abstract

Using high pressure liquid chromatography, the cucumber cotyledon bioassay, and mass spectrometry a cytokinin isolated from Solanum tuberosum L. cv. Katahdin plant tissues has been identified as cis-zeatin riboside. Zeatin riboside (ZR) levels in plants grown under inducing conditions (28 C day and 13 C night with a 10-hour photoperiod) were significantly higher than those in plants grown under noninducing conditions (30 C day and 28 C night with an 18-hour photoperiod). The highest level of ZR was noted in below-ground tissue after 4 days exposure to inducing conditions, with tuber initiation observed after 8 days. A companion study conducted to determine the effect of ZR on in vitro tuberization of noninduced rhizomes revealed that after 1 month in culture, controls exhibited 0% tuberization, while ZR treatments of 0.3 and 3.0 milligrams per liter showed 39 and 75% tuberization, respectively.

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