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Two Kinds of Protein Glycosylation in a Cell-Free Preparation from Developing Cotyledons of Phaseolus vulgaris

H. Maelor Davies and Deborah P. Delmer
Plant Physiology
Vol. 68, No. 2 (Aug., 1981), pp. 284-291
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4266888
Page Count: 8
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Two Kinds of Protein Glycosylation in a Cell-Free Preparation from Developing Cotyledons of Phaseolus vulgaris
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Abstract

Membrane preparations from developing cotyledons of red kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) transferred radioactive mannose from GDP-mannose (U-[14C]mannose) to endogenous acceptor proteins. The transfer was inhibited by the antibiotic tunicamycin, suggesting the involvement of lipidoligosaccharide intermediates typical of the pathway for glycosylation of asparagine residues. This was supported by the similarity of the linkage types of radioactive mannose in lipid-oligosaccharide and glycoprotein products; both contained labeled 2-linked mannose, 3,6-linked and terminal mannose typical of glycoprotein "core" oligosaccharides. As expected for "core" glycosylation, the transfer of labeled N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) from UDP-GlcNAc (6-[3H]GLcNAc) to 4-linkage in endogenous glycoproteins could also be demonstrated. However, most of the radioactive GlcNAc was incorporated into terminal linkage, in a reaction insensitive to tunicamycin. The proteins receiving "core" oligosaccharide in vitro were heterogeneous in size, in contrast to those receiving most of the GlcNAc (which chiefly comprised the seed reserve-proteins phaseolin and phytohemagglutinin). It is suggested that following "core" glycosylation, single GlcNAc residues are attached terminally to the oligosaccharides of these seed proteins, without the involvement of lipid-linked intermediates. Phaseolin from mature seeds does not possess a significant amount of terminal GlcNAc and so it is possible that these residues are subsequently removed in a processing event.

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