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La Russie et l'OTAN : une nouvelle étape ?

Youri ROUBINSKI
Politique étrangère
Vol. 62, No. 4 (HIVER 1997 / 1998), pp. 543-558
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/42675532
Page Count: 16
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La Russie et l'OTAN : une nouvelle étape ?
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Abstract

Youri Roubinski décrit, du point de vue russe, le processus qui a abouti à la conclusion de l'Acte fondateur entre la Russie et l'OTAN avec pour toile de fond la question de l'élargissement de l'Alliance atUntique en direction de l'Est et le refus russe d'envisager une telle perspective. Pour lui, l'opposition officielle russe a été plus rhétorique que réelle. Moscou s'est efforcée d'effectuer une pression sur les Occidentaux en vue d'obtenir des compensations lors des négociations. Or, les garanties occidentales inclues dans l'Acte fondateur semblent bien floues et, en tout cas, bien éloignées du souhait russe de voir se constituer un système de sécurité collective européen autour de l'OSCE et en dehors de la « tutelle » américaine. The enlargement of NATO to the East has caused the most serious crisis of confidence between post-communist Russia and the West since the end of the Cold War. Moscow's resolutely negative reaction was due to both geostrategic and psychological considerations: loss of infrastructure and weapons markets in the former satellite states, fear of a growing military imbalance in Europe, a tendency for the Alliance to be transformed into the principal peacekeeping instrument at the expense of the UN Security Council and the OSCE. A protracted diplomatic battle resulted in the signing in Paris of the Founding Act between Russia and NATO on May 27, 1997. Being the result of a compromise, the true scope of this document depends on the ability of both parties to find specific areas for joint or concerted action in order to keep the peace on the continent, taking into account the lessons of the Yugoslav crisis and integrating the many Euratlantic bodies into a coherent framework of the single architecture of regional security.

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