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Nitrogen Redistribution during Grain Growth in Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.): IV. Development of a Quantitative Model of the Translocation of Nitrogen to the Grain

Richard J. Simpson, Hans Lambers and Michael J. Dalling
Plant Physiology
Vol. 71, No. 1 (Jan., 1983), pp. 7-14
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4267780
Page Count: 8
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Nitrogen Redistribution during Grain Growth in Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.): IV. Development of a Quantitative Model of the Translocation of Nitrogen to the Grain
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Abstract

Translocation of nitrogen was measured in wheat (Triticum aestivium L. cv SUN 9E) plants grown without an exogenous supply of nitrogen from the time that the flagleaf began to emerge, and a model of nitrogen translocation was constructed to describe translocation on one day during the linear period of grain growth. Nitrogen for grain development was derived entirely by the redistribution of nitrogen from vegetative organs. Leaves contributed 40%, glumes 23%, stem 23%, and roots 16% of the nitrogen incorporated by the grains on the fifteenth day after anthesis. Less than 50% of the nitrogen exported from leaves was translocated directly to the grain via the phloem, the rest was translocated to the roots and was cycled in the roots and exported to the shoot in the transpiration stream. Nitrogen imported by leaves and glumes via the xylem was not accumulated in these organs but was transferred to the phloem for reexport from the organs. A large proportion (60%) of the nitrogen in the transpiration stream was cycled in the glumes. The glumes were also a major source of nitrogen for grain development. It was considered likely that this organ always plays an important role in nitrogen metabolism in wheat.

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