Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Píseň, již stíhám a která mi neustále uniká (O vzpomínání v poezii Ivana Blatného)

Jiří Krejčí
Česká literatura
Vol. 55, No. 4 (ZÁŘÍ 2007), pp. 517-537
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/42687290
Page Count: 21
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Píseň, již stíhám a která mi neustále uniká (O vzpomínání v poezii Ivana Blatného)
Preview not available

Abstract

This article considers the function of anamnestic imagery in the collection of verse Hledání přítomného času (In Search of Time Present) by Ivan Blatný (1919—1990). The author starts by defining memory as an act of recall of temporal consciousness (while analyzing the concept of temporality in the works of Bergson and Husserl), and focuses on anamnestic imagery in certain collections of verse in relation to their overall structure. Four analytical chapters are of key importance here; at the centre of each is verse by one poet: S lodí, jež dováží čaj a kávu by Konstantin Biebl (1898—1951), Praha s prsty deště by Vítězslav Nezval (1900—1958), Hledání přítomného času by Blatný, and Dávné proso by Jan Skácel (1922—1989). By comparing the individual studies, which represent two contrasting attitudes to anamnestic imagery in modern Czech lyric verse, the author seeks to come up with a hypothesis about the general nature of lyrical anamnestic images. The attempt to comprehend Blatný’s collection begins chiefly with considerations of temporality in the work of Emil Staiger (1908—1987) and also the hermeneutics of understanding of Hans-Georg Gadamer (1900—2002). Hledání přítomného času unites two forms of Blatný’s verse: on the one hand the collection contains poems of a musical nature, corresponding to Blatný’s style before joining Skupina 42 (The 42 Group); on the other hand, it contains verse written under the influence of the principies of the group. The article seeks to find what it was that provided the unity of mood of both forms of Blatný’s verse at the phonic (euphonic) level, lexical (motivic) level, and syntactic level. The common denominator seems to be Blatný’s consideration of temporality, a tendency to articulate the “fullness of the moment.” That is manifested in the elementary principies of return (repetition) and unification. These principies are most evident at the motif level. Blatný’s being “ in search of the present” is understood as being in search of the moment when the everyday merges with the historic. Inspired by Proust's À la recherche du temps perdu, Blatný finds the historie mainly in expressing the banal details that surround him. The personal recollection of everyday life takes on the importance of a testimony of “big” history. In Blatný’s collection the repeated motif of the road, fundamental particularly to the longest poem of the first part, “Dějiny” (History), becomes a characteristic metaphor for time. The lyric persona in it, much as in many other poems, is stylized as a fláneur. Blatný’s second most frequent autostylization is the poet sitting in his room and concentrating on capturing the present moment. Both stylizations are in essence related to anamnestic imagery. The desire to express the total moment, to find the quality of time in its durée, is illustrated by examples of changes in tense, which move towards the gnomic. The monumental concluding poem, “Terrestris,” reads as a new opportunity to “find time present,” the expression of the moment. It is the mysterious mythical being that unites all opposites and embodies the order of life in the fleetingness of time.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
[517]
    [517]
  • Thumbnail: Page 
518
    518
  • Thumbnail: Page 
519
    519
  • Thumbnail: Page 
520
    520
  • Thumbnail: Page 
521
    521
  • Thumbnail: Page 
522
    522
  • Thumbnail: Page 
523
    523
  • Thumbnail: Page 
524
    524
  • Thumbnail: Page 
525
    525
  • Thumbnail: Page 
526
    526
  • Thumbnail: Page 
527
    527
  • Thumbnail: Page 
528
    528
  • Thumbnail: Page 
529
    529
  • Thumbnail: Page 
530
    530
  • Thumbnail: Page 
531
    531
  • Thumbnail: Page 
532
    532
  • Thumbnail: Page 
533
    533
  • Thumbnail: Page 
534
    534
  • Thumbnail: Page 
535
    535
  • Thumbnail: Page 
536
    536
  • Thumbnail: Page 
537
    537