Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Role of Gibberellin in the Growth Response of Submerged Deep Water Rice

Ilya Raskin and Hans Kende
Plant Physiology
Vol. 76, No. 4 (Dec., 1984), pp. 947-950
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4269034
Page Count: 4
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Role of Gibberellin in the Growth Response of Submerged Deep Water Rice
Preview not available

Abstract

We have shown previously that ethylene, which accumulates in the air spaces of submerged stem sections of rice (Oryza sativa L. cv "Habiganj Aman II"), is involved in regulating the growth response caused by submergence. The role of gibberellins in the submergence response was studied using tetcyclacis (TCY), a new plant growth retardant, which inhibits gibberellin biosynthesis. Stem sections excised from plants that had been watered with a solution of 1 micromolar TCY for 7 to 10 days did not elongate when submerged in the same solution or when exposed to 1 microliter per liter ethylene in air. Gibberellic acid (GA3) at 0.3 micromolar overcame the effect of TCY and restored the rapid internodal elongation in submerged and ethylene-treated sections to the levels observed in control sections that had not been treated with TCY. The effect of 0.01 to 0.2 micromolar GA3 on internodal elongation was enhanced two- to eight-fold when 1 microliter per liter ethylene was added to the air passing through the chamber in which the sections were incubated. GA3 and ethylene caused a similar increase in cell division and cell elongation in rice internodes. Thus, ethylene may cause internodal elongation in rice by increasing the activity of endogenous GAs. In internodes from which the leaf sheath had been peeled off, growth in response to submergence, ethylene and GA3 was severely inhibited by light.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
947
    947
  • Thumbnail: Page 
948
    948
  • Thumbnail: Page 
949
    949
  • Thumbnail: Page 
950
    950