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Nog meet nieuw Werk van Jacob van Utrecht

J. J. DE MESQUITA
Oud Holland
Vol. 58, No. 3/4 (1941), pp. 135-147
Published by: Brill
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/42710406
Page Count: 13
Topics: Hems, Zoos, Toes, Maars, Platens, Hoes
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Nog meet nieuw Werk van Jacob van Utrecht
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Abstract

The "Descent from the Cross"-triptych, of Jacob van Utrecht, formerly in Berlin and now in Gottingen, appears to date from the year 1513. This work must have been painted for 'the Cistercian Order who regard St. Bernard of Clairvaux as one of their founders. This, as also other works of the same master, show affinity with the work of Jacob Cornelisz. Two panels, at Cologne and Schleissheim, are attributed by the writer to Jacob of Utrecht. They represent, on one side, incidents in the life of St. Bernard of Clairvaux (both referring to his journey, when he preached the crusade in Germany in 1146), and, on the other side, the birth of Christ and the Adoration of the Magi. The writer points out that, together with a marked resemblance, there is also a difference between the "Descent from the Cross"-triptych and these two panels, which would probably date some years later. The painter has borrowed two of his heads from portraits of Jan van Eyck, with whose Paele-Madonna, at Bruges, he must have been acquainted. On the panel with the "Adoration" he has introduced the Utrecht Cathedral. These two panels come from the Benedictine Abbey of Gross Sankt Martin. at Cologne. Judging from the itinerary of his journeys from Antwerp to Liibeck and back, it is probable that the painter had connections at Cologne. In a postscriptum the writer refers to a recently found portrait by Jacob van Utrecht, and further mentions other two works which he includes in the oeuvre of this master.

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