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Meester van de Khanenko-aanbidding of Meester van de Kruisiging te Turijn

K. G. BOON
Oud Holland
Vol. 68, No. 4 (1953), pp. 209-216
Published by: Brill
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/42710580
Page Count: 8
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Meester van de Khanenko-aanbidding of Meester van de Kruisiging te Turijn
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Abstract

F. Diilberg and G. J. Hoogewerff assumed that a triptych at Turin with the Crucifixion and a Crucifixion at Frankfort, both of which show superficial similarities with Enghebrechtsz's art, were works by Huug Jacobs., the father of Lucas van Leyden. It has been found, however, that these paintings form part of a larger group, the common characteristics of which have hitherto passed unobserved. The following may be taken to belong to this group: a triptych with the Pietà, now in the hands of the Amsterdam art dealer De Boer, another triptych with Christ and the Samaritan woman at the well, auctioned at Berlin in 1953, and a painting in the Samuel collection, London, a description of which has already been published by Friedländer. This small group shows a number of features which link it with the art of Hugo van der Goes. The two Crucifixions, however, also point to a relation with Antwerp painters, such as the Master of Frankfort and the young Gossaert. This would seem to indicate that the painter of this group may have begun as an imitator of Van der Goes and then, in Antwerp, became more inclined towards mannerism. From the fact that analogies with work by Van der Goes repeatedly crop up it is clear that his relations with the Ghent painter must have been fairly close. The question may even be raised whether he could not be identified with the painter called by Friedlander the Master of the Khanenko Adoration. This work displays great affinity with some of the paintings illustrated here. It might be a juvenile work, executed at the time when the painter had not yet come into contact with trends inherent in the Antwerp school. At any rate, the superficial points of agreement with the Leyden school and the admittedly somewhat Dutch nature of these pictures do not furnish sufficient proof of the authorship of Huug Jacobsz., even if he had been in the Southern Netherlands for a short period, between 1480 and 1494.

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