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Action Spectrum for Interaction between Visible and Far-Red Light on Face Chloroplast Orientation in Mougeotia

Zbigniew Lechowski and Jan Białczyk
Plant Physiology
Vol. 88, No. 1 (Sep., 1988), pp. 189-193
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4271544
Page Count: 5
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Action Spectrum for Interaction between Visible and Far-Red Light on Face Chloroplast Orientation in Mougeotia
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Abstract

The orientation of chloroplasts from profile to face position in Mougeotia can be controlled in two ways: by a typical phytochrome-mediated system or by continuous, simultaneous irradiation with far-red and visible light. In experiments with dichromatic irradiation of Mougeotia, the light conditions applied prevented the formation of a far-red-absorbing form of phytochrome gradient in the cell. An unpolarized background of far-red light and linearly polarized monochromatic light of different wave-lengths and vibrating parallel to the cell axis, if given by themselves, were completely ineffective in producing any changes in chloroplast orientation. Given together, however, changes in chloroplast orientation were induced. The action spectrum for this interaction between constant far-red and variable visible light was maximal at 620 nanometers. The chloroplast response in these dichromatic light conditions required a prolonged duration of exposure to simultaneous continuous irradiation of high fluence energy. The vibrating plane of linearly polarized 620 nanometer light had no significant influence on interaction with far-red light in chloroplast movement. The results obtained are different from the typical low energy phytochrome-mediated chloroplast orientation. This new type of chloroplast photoresponse might be mediated by an unknown sensory pigment.

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