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De etsen van Willem Buytewech

J. G. VAN GELDER
Oud Holland
Vol. 48 (1931), pp. 49-72
Published by: Brill
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/42718780
Page Count: 24
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De etsen van Willem Buytewech
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Abstract

After an introduction to Buytewech's etchings, the writer sums up the results of a renewed research as to the dates of these etchings, and enumerates his probable teachers. The influence of Rubens can be traced until about 1615. Three etchings — here added to the catalogue of Van der Kellen — even bear Ruben's name. The first plate (fig. 2, Cat. no. 2) shows some affinity with S. Frisius in respect to the technique (fig. 3), the others (figs. 11 and 12, Cat. nos. 6 and 7) a close resemblance with Buytewech's representations of St. Franciscus and St. Simon (figs. 1, 4 and 5). The St. Franciscus, signed B. W. F. (fig. 4, Cat. no. 3) is, moreover, a copy of an engraving by Matham (B. 98) (fig. 10) of the year 1611, after a painting by Elsheimer. In two others, representing Bathsheba, Rubens' influence can again be seen. After 1615 the character of his work undergoes a complete change. It becomes realistic, didactic and sharp in the delineating of every movement. The culminating point is reached in the "Lovers' Conversation" (fig. 8), which will have been intended for the title-page of "Lucelle", a drama by Bredero (printed in 1616). The persons represented are Lucelle and Ascagnes, while Leckerbeetje (the cook) spies upon them (Act III, scene 2, line 1508 etc.). Also the "Gunner and Vivandière" and the landscape series are of 1616, the former on account of its similitude with Jan v. d. Velde's falconer (Fr. v. d. K., 121—124), and the 10 little landscapes because one of the plates (Cat. no. 22) was copied by Jan v. d. Velde and had already been published in 1616 (Fr. v. d. K., 296). Two of the landscapes have been identified (Cat. nos. 22 and 23). Finally the "St. Lucas", not mentioned as yet by v. d. Kellen (fig. 9, Cat. no. 36), must have been one of his last etchings (1620—1624). A catalogue in chronological order is given at the end of the article. All the impressions (as far as these are known) are mentioned. Nos. 13 and 21—27 of v. d. Kellen's list have been given under the "incorrect attributions".

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