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Induction of Hydrolytic Enzymes in Brassica campestris in Response to Pathovars of Xanthomonas campestris

Jutta Conrads-Strauch, J. Maxwell Dow, Dawn E. Milligan, Romelia Parra and Michael J. Daniels
Plant Physiology
Vol. 93, No. 1 (May, 1990), pp. 238-243
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4272808
Page Count: 6
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Induction of Hydrolytic Enzymes in Brassica campestris in Response to Pathovars of Xanthomonas campestris
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Abstract

Inoculation of mature leaves of turnip (Brassica campestris) with the incompatible Xanthomonas campestris pv vitians resulted in the induction of β-1,3-glucanase and chitinase/lysozyme (CHL) activity. No increase in the basal activity of β-1,3-glucanase was observed after inoculation of leaves with heat- or rifampicin-killed X. c. vitians, Escherichia coli, or sterile water. Inoculation with the compatible X. campestris pv campestris resulted in a slower induction of glucanase than that seen with X. c. vitians. In contrast, all bacteria caused an induction of CHL activity. One major β-1,3-glucanase (molecular mass 36.5 kilodaltons, isoelectric point [pl] ∼8.5) was purified from both inoculated and untreated leaves by ion-exchange chromatography. The enzyme degraded laminarin by an endo-glycolytic mechanism. Two major CHL isozymes (CHL 1 and CHL 2, molecular mass 30 kilodaltons and pl 9.4 and 10.2, respectively) were purified from X. c. vitians inoculated leaves by affinity chromatography on a chitin column followed by ion-exchange chromatography. Both enzymes degraded chitin by an endo-glycolytic mechanism although the ratio of lysozyme to chitinase specific activities for CHL 1 and CHL2 were different. The induction of CHL 1 was associated with the hypersensitive reaction caused by X. c. vitians whereas all other treatments induced largely CHL 2.

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