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HIV/AIDS in Early Childhood Centers: The Ethical Dilemma of Confidentiality versus Disclosure

Sandra M. Black
Young Children
Vol. 54, No. 2 (MARCH 1999), pp. 39-45
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/42728504
Page Count: 7
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Abstract

At meeting time, four-year-old Josh shares weekend news with his friends. He says, "Uncle Joe died because he has AIDS. All the people were crying and rushing around. Me and my sister had to be quiet. "In another city, in another early childhood center, three-year-old Natasha is silently weeping. Her teacher goes to soothe her and asks why she is so sad. Natasha whispers, "Because the ambulance took my momma to the hospital and she didn't come home. She stayed there because she has AIDS." A neighbor tells a teacher in a suburban child care center that an infant in the center is HIV positive; however, the baby's parent has not revealed this information to the baby's classroom teacher.

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