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Distribution of Indole-3-Acetic Acid and the Occurrence of Its Alkali-Labile Conjugates in the Extraxylary Region of Pinus sylvestris Stems

Björn Sundberg, C. H. Anthony Little and Keming Cui
Plant Physiology
Vol. 93, No. 4 (Aug., 1990), pp. 1295-1302
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4272981
Page Count: 8
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Distribution of Indole-3-Acetic Acid and the Occurrence of Its Alkali-Labile Conjugates in the Extraxylary Region of Pinus sylvestris Stems
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Abstract

Free and conjugated indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) were measured by quantitative gas chromatography-selected ion monitoring-mass spectrometry in the extraxylary region of the stem of large Pinus sylvestris (L.) trees during the annual cycle of cambial activity and dormancy. The extraxylary region at the stem top and bottom was divided into 3 and 4 fractions, respectively, for the free IAA measurements, while the entire extraxylary region was extracted when the IAA-conjugates were analyzed. The effect on the distribution pattern of expressing IAA level as a concentration (per gram fresh weight or dry weight) and as total amount (per square centimeter) was examined. The IAA level was much higher in the cambial region than in the fractions that contained the nonfunctional phloem and the periderm. The largest IAA concentration occurred in the fraction that included the cambium, whereas the total amount of IAA was greatest in the phloem-containing fraction. The significance of the nonuniform radial distribution of IAA for estimating the IAA concentration in the cambial region is discussed in relation to how the cambial region is sampled. A slight longitudinal gradient in IAA concentration, decreasing from the top to the bottom of the stem, was observed in the cambial region when the cambium was in the grand period of activity, but not at the end of the cambial growing period. In all fractions, the total amount of IAA was highest when the cambium was active. However, the IAA concentration in the cambial region did not follow the same pattern, actually being lowest during the tracheid production period at the stem bottom. IAA conjugates were detected on all sampling dates except June 23, but their concentrations were always less than 14% of that of free IAA, and their occurrence did not obviously vary during the year. In general, there was a higher concentration of ester conjugates than of amide conjugates, and the ester conjugates were more abundant at the top of the stem than at the bottom.

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