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Concurrent Synthesis and Degradation of Alcohol Dehydrogenase in Elicitor-Treated and Wounded Potato Tubers

C. Peter Constabel, Daniel P. Matton and Normand Brisson
Plant Physiology
Vol. 94, No. 3 (Nov., 1990), pp. 887-891
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4273177
Page Count: 5
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Concurrent Synthesis and Degradation of Alcohol Dehydrogenase in Elicitor-Treated and Wounded Potato Tubers
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Abstract

The accumulation of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) in arachidonic acid-elicited potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tuber discs was studied. In accordance with our previous report of the accumulation of Adh mRNA beginning 2 hours after elicitor treatment (DP Matton, CP Constabel, N Brisson [1990] Plant Mol Biol 14: 775-783), immunoprecipitation of ADH from in vivo labeled discs indicated that ADH synthesis occurred as early as 12 hours after treatment. However, levels of ADH activity and protein, as shown by enzyme assay and immunoblot, did not rise in parallel but decreased during the first 24 hours of treatment. After 24 hours, ADH activity and protein began to increase, reaching a severalfold increase at 96 hours after elicitation. Water-treated control discs showed a similar though delayed and less pronounced pattern. These results imply a turnover of ADH following elicitor treatment of potato tuber discs. As shown by nondenaturing gel electrophoresis, the synthesis and degradation involved the same ADH isozyme.

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