Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Ethylene Production by Growing and Senescing Pear Fruit Cell Suspensions in Response to Gibberellin

Ruth Ben-Arie and Ian B. Ferguson
Plant Physiology
Vol. 95, No. 3 (Mar., 1991), pp. 943-947
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4273482
Page Count: 5
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Ethylene Production by Growing and Senescing Pear Fruit Cell Suspensions in Response to Gibberellin
Preview not available

Abstract

A pear (Pyrus communis L. cv Passe Crassane) cell suspension was used as a model system to study the influence of gibberellin on processes related to fruit ripening. Growth of the cell cultures was inhibited and their loss of viability was accelerated when 0.5 millimolar gibberllic acid (GA3) was added to suspensions at two stages of cell development, namely, growth and quiescence. Cell respiration rate was unaffected up to 2 millimolar GA3 but ethylene production, both basal and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid-induced, was inhibited at all stages of cell development. However, the degree of inhibition decreased as the cell cultures aged. The site of ethylene inhibition by GA3 appeared to be related to the ethylene-forming enzyme. The coincident acceleration of cell senescence and inhibition of ethylene production indicate that the pear cell suspension cannot serve as an analogous model for studying the mode of action of gibberellin in delaying ripening and senescence of fruits in its entirety, although certain specific effects might be relevant.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
943
    943
  • Thumbnail: Page 
944
    944
  • Thumbnail: Page 
945
    945
  • Thumbnail: Page 
946
    946
  • Thumbnail: Page 
947
    947