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CO₂ Enhancement of Growth and Photosynthesis in Rice (Oryza sativa): Modification by Increased Ultraviolet-B Radiation

Lewis H. Ziska and Alan H. Teramura
Plant Physiology
Vol. 99, No. 2 (Jun., 1992), pp. 473-481
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4274372
Page Count: 9
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
CO₂ Enhancement of Growth and Photosynthesis in Rice (Oryza sativa): Modification by Increased Ultraviolet-B Radiation
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Abstract

Two cultivars of rice (Oryza sativa L.) IR-36 and Fujiyama-5 were grown at ambient (360 microbars) and elevated CO2 (660 microbars) from germination through reproduction in unshaded greenhouses at the Duke University Phytotron. Growth at elevated CO2 resulted in significant decreases in nighttime respiration and increases in photosynthesis, total biomass, and yield for both cultivars. However, in plants exposed to simultaneous increases in CO2 and ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation, CO2 enhancement effects on respiration, photosynthesis, and biomass were eliminated in IR-36 and significantly reduced in Fujiyama-5. UV-B radiation simulated a 25% depletion in stratospheric ozone at Durham, North Carolina. Analysis of the response of CO2 uptake to internal CO2 concentration at light saturation suggested that, for IR-36, the predominant limitation to photosynthesis with increased UV-B radiation was the capacity for regeneration of ribulose bisphosphate (RuBP), whereas for Fujiyama-5 the primary photosynthetic decrease appeared to be related to a decline in apparent carboxylation efficiency. Changes in the RuBP regeneration limitation in IR-36 were consistent with damage to the photochemical efficiency of photosystem II as estimated from the ratio of variable to maximum chlorophyll fluorescence. Little change in RuBP regeneration and photochemistry was evident in cultivar Fujiyama-5, however. The degree of sensitivity of photochemical reactions with increased UV-B radiation appeared to be related to leaf production of UV-B-absorbing compounds. Fujiyama-5 had a higher concentration of these compounds than IR-36 in all environments, and the production of these compounds in Fujiyama-5 was stimulated by UV-B fluence. Results from this study suggest that in rice alterations in growth or photosynthesis as a result of enhanced CO2 may be eliminated or reduced if UV-B radiation continues to increase.

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