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TRANSPORTATION AND SOCIETAL DEVELOPMENTS (IL TRASPORTO E GLI SVILUPPI DELLA SOCIETÀ)

L. H. KLAASSEN
International Journal of Transport Economics / Rivista internazionale di economia dei trasporti
Vol. 9, No. 3 (DICEMBRE 1982), pp. 261-270
Published by: Accademia Editoriale
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/42748116
Page Count: 10
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TRANSPORTATION AND SOCIETAL DEVELOPMENTS (IL TRASPORTO E GLI SVILUPPI DELLA SOCIETÀ)
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Abstract

Now that the price of energy and consequently the cost of travelling have risen so steeply, transportation will be an important concern in future urban designs, which means that the city planners will have to cooperate more than ever with traffic engineers and transportation economist to arrive at sensible new structures. After the short-term social reorientation, physical reorientation will follow and densities will increase. Physical urban structures may be transformed in the longer run into two stages. The first adjustment could be to prevent current rules for urban design been applied in the future. New constructions could at least be adapted to the present high transportation costs. The second adjustment would be to increase existing densities. The philosophy behind the réorientation policy is that we should not, as we have done too often in the past, create physical structures with total disregard for the volume and structure of traffic they generate. The proposal is to design physical structures that implicitly minimise total generalised transportation costs for the city as a whole. The less diffuse society, to which we are once more moving, may generate a form of planning which can well make for new cities that are better to live in than they have been for a long time.

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