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Diagnosis of the Earliest Strain-Specific Interactions between Tobacco Mosaic Virus and Chloroplasts of Tobacco Leaves in vivo by Means of Chlorophyll Fluorescence Imaging

Suchandra Balachandran, C. Barry Osmond and Paul F. Daley
Plant Physiology
Vol. 104, No. 3 (Mar., 1994), pp. 1059-1065
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4275723
Page Count: 7
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Diagnosis of the Earliest Strain-Specific Interactions between Tobacco Mosaic Virus and Chloroplasts of Tobacco Leaves in vivo by Means of Chlorophyll Fluorescence Imaging
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Abstract

Fluorescence imaging was used to diagnose early stages of the strain-specific interactions between tobacco mosaic virus (strain PV230) and chloroplasts following infection of tobacco leaves (Nicotiana tabacum cv Xanthi). The earliest indication of interaction in tissues that ultimately become chlorotic was a reduction in chlorophyll fluorescence, and there was little fluorescence quenching compared with adjacent healthy tissues. Subsequently, fluorescence increased but remained unquenched. In the late stages fluorescence declined again in chlorotic regions as the chlorotic-mosaic symptoms developed. These in vivo data showing altered fluorescence yields confirm strain-specific interaction of virus coat protein with photosystem II (PSII) components in vitro, leading to photoinhibition and photooxidation of chlorophyll in infected cells and the development of visible chlorotic-mosaic symptoms. Although mechanisms leading to the low, unquenched fluorescence condition are not known, the intermediate high, unquenched fluorescence condition is consistent with impaired PSII electron transport as measured in vitro. Fluorescence lesions appear more rapidly and develop more extensively in high light, consistent with the faster and larger extent of symptom formation in high-light-grown leaves than in low-light-grown leaves.

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