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Multiple Developmental Pathways Leading to a Single Morph: Monosulcate Pollen (Examples From the Asparagales)

L. PENET, S. NADOT, A. RESSAYRE, A. FORCHIONI, L. DREYER and P. H. GOUYON
Annals of Botany
Vol. 95, No. 2 (January 2005), pp. 331-343
Published by: Oxford University Press
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/42759285
Page Count: 13
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Multiple Developmental Pathways Leading to a Single Morph: Monosulcate Pollen (Examples From the Asparagales)
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Abstract

• Background and Aims Early developmental events in microsporogenesis are known to play a role in pollen morphology: variation in cytokinesis type, cell wall formation, tetrad shape and aperture polarity are responsible for pollen aperture patterning. Despite the existence of other morphologies, monosulcate pollen is one of the most common aperture types in monocots, and is also considered as the ancestral condition in this group. It is known to occur from either a successive or a simultaneous cytokinesis. In the present study, the developmental sequence of microsporogenesis is investigated in several species of Asparagales that produce such monosulcate pollen, representing most families of this important monocot clade. • Methods The developmental pathway of microsporogenesis was investigated using light transmission and epifluorescence microscopy for all species studied. Confocal microscopy was used to confirm centripetal cell plate formation. • Key Results Microsporogenesis is diverse in Asparagales, and most variation is generally found between families. It is confirmed that the whole higher Asparagales clade has a very conserved microsporogenesis, with a successive cytokinesis and centrifugal cell plate formation. Centripetal cell wall formation is described in Tecophilaeaceae and Iridaceae, a feature that had so far only been reported for eudicots. • Conclusions Monosulcate pollen can be obtained from several developmental pathways, leading thus to homoplasy in the monosulcate character state. Monosulcate pollen should not therefore be considered as the ancestral state unless it is produced through the ancestral developmental pathway. The question about the ancestral developmental pathway leading to monosulcy remains open.

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