Access

You are not currently logged in.

Access your personal account or get JSTOR access through your library or other institution:

login

Log in to your personal account or through your institution.

If You Use a Screen Reader

This content is available through Read Online (Free) program, which relies on page scans. Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.

Effect of Aerobic Priming on the Response of Echinochloa crus-pavonis to Anaerobic Stress. Protein Synthesis and Phosphorylation

Fan Zhang, Jih-Jing Lin, Theodore C. Fox, Cesar V. Mujer, Mary E. Rumpho and Robert A. Kennedy
Plant Physiology
Vol. 105, No. 4 (Aug., 1994), pp. 1149-1157
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4275965
Page Count: 9
  • Read Online (Free)
  • Subscribe ($19.50)
  • Cite this Item
Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Effect of Aerobic Priming on the Response of Echinochloa crus-pavonis to Anaerobic Stress. Protein Synthesis and Phosphorylation
Preview not available

Abstract

Echinochloa species differ in their ability to germinate and grow in the absence of oxygen. Seeds of Echinochloa crus-pavonis (H.B.K.) Schult do not germinate under anoxia but remain viable for extended periods (at least 30 d) when incubated in an anaerobic environment. E. crus-pavonis can be induced to germinate and grow in an anaerobic environment if the seeds are first subjected to a short (1-18 h) exposure to aerobic conditions (aerobic priming). Changes in polypeptide patterns (constitutive and de novo synthesized) and protein phosphorylation induced by aerobic priming were investigated. In the absence of aerobic priming protein degradation was not evident under anaerobic conditions, although synthesis of a 20-kD polypeptide was induced. During aerobic priming, however, synthesis of 37- and 55-kD polypeptides was induced and persisted upon return of the seeds to anoxia. Furthermore, phosphorylation of two 18-kD polypeptides was observed only in those seeds that were labeled with 32PO4 during the aerobic priming period. Subsequent chasing in an anaerobic environment resulted in a decrease in phosphorylation of these polypeptides. Likewise, phosphorylation of the 18-kD polypeptides was not observed if the seeds were labeled in an anaerobic atmosphere. These results suggest that the regulated induction of the 20-, 37-, and 55-kD polypeptides may be important for anaerobic germination and growth of E. crus-pavonis and that the specific phosphorylation of the 18-kD polypeptides may be a factor in regulating this induction.

Page Thumbnails

  • Thumbnail: Page 
1149
    1149
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1150
    1150
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1151
    1151
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1152
    1152
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1153
    1153
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1154
    1154
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1155
    1155
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1156
    1156
  • Thumbnail: Page 
1157
    1157