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Identification and Gene Expression of Anaerobically Induced Enolase in Echinochloa phyllopogon and Echinochloa crus-pavonis

Theodore C. Fox, Cesar V. Mujer, David L. Andrews, Adrienne S. Williams, B. Greg Cobb, Robert A. Kennedy and Mary E. Rumpho
Plant Physiology
Vol. 109, No. 2 (Oct., 1995), pp. 433-443
Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4276821
Page Count: 11
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Since scans are not currently available to screen readers, please contact JSTOR User Support for access. We'll provide a PDF copy for your screen reader.
Identification and Gene Expression of Anaerobically Induced Enolase in Echinochloa phyllopogon and Echinochloa crus-pavonis
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Abstract

Enolase (2-phospho-D-glycerate hydrolase, EC 4.2.1.11) has been identified as an anaerobic stress protein in Echinochloa oryzoides based on the homology of its internal amino acid sequence with those of enolases from other organisms, by immunological reactivity, and induction of catalytic activity during anaerobic stress. Enolase activity was induced 5-fold in anoxically treated seedlings of three flood-tolerant species (E. oryzoides, Echinochloa phyllopogon, and rice [Oryza sativa L.]) but not in the flood-intolerant species (Echinochloa crus-pavonis). A 540-bp fragment of the enolase gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction from cDNAs of E. phyllopogon and maize (Zea mays L.) and used to estimate the number of enolase genes and to study the expression of enolase transcripts in E. phyllopogon, E. crus-pavonis, and maize. Southern blot analysis indicated that only one enolase gene is present in either E. phyllopogon or E. crus-pavonis. Three patterns of enolase gene expression were observed in the three species studied. In E. phyllopogon, enolase induction at both the mRNA and enzyme activity levels was sustained at all times with a further induction after 48 h of anoxia. In contrast, enolase was induced in hypoxically treated maize root tips only at the mRNA level. In E. crus-pavonis, enolase mRNA and enzyme activity were induced during hypoxia, but activity was only transiently elevated. These results suggest that enolase expression in maize and E. crus-pavonis during anoxia are similarly regulated at the transcriptional level but differ in post-translational regulation, whereas enolase is fully induced in E. phyllopogon during anaerobiosis.

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